4-H News May 27, 2020

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4-H Updates

   Academic Un-Conference – This year’s 4-H Conference is going digital, with the learning sessions being hands-on demonstrations, interactive activities, and virtual tours. Just a reminder, the deadline to sign up is June 1, and the activities are open to any 4-H’er in grades 6-8 as of January 1. You must contact your 4-H agent to register.

   4-H Zoom Meetings will be on Tuesdays and Thursdays for 4-H’ers or parents/guardians who want to meet with Mrs. Samantha, or any other time during the weekdays from 8am-4:30pm by appointment. Contact her for the link to the Zoom meeting.

4-H: A Healthy Livin’ Summer

   The Tennessee 4-H will be conducting a fun activity campaign this summer with daily hands-on healthy living activities that you can do to create every day healthy habits. Videos will be posted daily on the Tennessee 4-H Facebook, Instagram, and Youtube. Daily themes include Mindful Monday, Tasty Tuesday, Wellness Wednesday, Thankful Thursday, Family Friday, Safety Saturday, and Self-care Sunday. You can earn beads for each daily theme to create your own Healthy Livin’ Summer Bracelet, plus a t-shirt and other cool stuff. To earn a bead for each daily theme, you must submit a minimum of three activities per theme – you can also earn special beads for multiple submissions! No registration required to participate, but you must submit your activities via a website. Check out the flyer with details on the Wayne County 4-H Facebook page, call the Extension Office, or e-mail scarte10@utk.edu for more information! 

Weekly STEM Activity

   Last week’s STEM activity dealt with a process called paper chromatography. When you dip the paper in the water, the dried black pigment dissolves and begins to separate. The water travels up the paper, carrying the pigment along with it. Since the different colored pigments are carried along at different rates, some will travel farther and faster than others – how fast each pigment travels depends on the size of the pigment molecule and how strongly the pigment is attracted to the paper. Since the water carries the different pigments at different rates, the black ink separates the colors that were mixed to make it, resulting in a rainbow on the paper.

   This week’s STEM activity is best done outside… it can get a little wet and messy! We’re going to make a tornado in a bottle! The supplies you will need are two empty bottles (you can use 20 ounce bottles or 2 liter bottles, but they will need to be the same size), water, duct tape, and food coloring.

   Fill the first bottle until about two-thirds full and add food coloring. Align the second bottle’s opening with the first, and secure it in place with duct tape. Move your bottles in a circle until the water is moving like a vortex inside, and flip it so the empty bottle is on the bottom to watch your tornado spin! (You may need to move it in a circle just a little more to keep the vortex moving.)

   How does this work? How is the action in this bottled tornado similar to the action of a real tornado?